Day 1: Butter, Bells, and Stolen Glass

We arrived in Paris on Sunday morning, at the very cold and quiet hour of 8am. First things first, and after dropping off the luggage at the hotel, we headed to Eric Kayser’s shop for breakfast. Even though the concept of the best Parisian baguette is heavily debated, and there are annual contests to that effect, Eric Kayser is considered by many to be the best artisanal baker in Paris. Proximity to his shop, as well as two markets, three artisanal cheese shops, etc, and several parks to eat those goodies in, is just one reason to stay in the Latin quarter (5th arrondissement). We already knew coffee in France was going to be unexciting, so our main focus of the breakfast was on the pastries and bread. Traditionally the French just have a croissant (or possibly pain au chocolat, brioche, etc.), or tartine (slice of a baguette with butter and jam). A tartine or any pastry at Eric Kayser is a very luxurious experience, although the weak, milky coffee did little to wake us up. But, since we were not planning on doing any differential equations that morning, we felt like we were off to a good start!

Sunday was a market day at Place Monge, and quite gingerly, we started getting our bearings for market shopping. We had a long first day of eating ahead of us, so there was no reason to get greedy. I drooled over the fresh spring peas, purple artichokes, radishes, sausages, oysters…but stopped myself, and only bought one basil-specked fresh and very, very goaty cheese. We also picked up a small rustic olive bread (fougasse), and had breakfast number 2 in a sunny spot nearby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As Paris started waking up slowly after the debaucheries of Saturday night, we were making our way down the narrow, windy streets of St. Germain du Pres neighborhood, on our way to Musee D’Orsay. Upon arrival, we saw lines that we eyeballed to be a 2 hour wait just to get in. I did know about the fabulous Degas Nudes exhibition, however, I misjudged the effect of the free entry to the museum on the first Sunday of the month. We thought we would come back another day, and instead went for a long preprandial walk on the Right Bank, passing by what was easily a 4-hour line to get into the Louvre for free. We had been to the Louvre, and instead went to Mariage Freres, arguably the best tea purveyer and shop in the world. No pictures were allowed, so please feel free to visit their website: http://www.mariagefreres.com/

We walked through the upstairs Tea Museum, and afterwards picked up a blue tea from Formosa for us (a tea category that is tricky to find in this country), and a couple of special requests from my mother who had been anxious to try the famous Mariage Freres stuff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our lunch plans involved true Breton galettes (buckwheat crepes) at the Breizh café in the Marais. We arrived early, and were lucky to snag an outside table, even though we did not make a reservation (a major faux pas, but I was duly apologetic). They have a long, long list of organic artisanal ciders, so we settled on a bottle of a very dry and perfumy Francois Sehedic cider, traditionally served in a bowl, with our crepe complet au jambon cru de Savoie (filled with nutty, melted gruyère and topped with an egg and top-quality ham). For dessert, we chose a simple crepe with sugar and Bordier butter.

A word about Jean-Yves Bordier, an artisanal butter maker from Brittany who over the years has developed a cult-like following.  To achieve the quality of his butter, Bordier uses very traditional techniques and the best possible cream from select herds of Holstein and Norman cows that graze in pastures not far from Rennes, in Brittany. In an interview with France Magazine he said that the last part of the process (the slow, careful kneading) takes the wonderful butter “to a new level of suppleness that industrial butter makers cannot afford to achieve”.

Our next stop took us to La Chocolaterie de Jacques Genin. Monsieur Genin is an incredible pastry chef, chocolatier and food stylist who is responsible for inspiring a new culinary obsession: caramels. His phenomenally luscious caramels made nightly cost 100 euros a kilo (which comes out to about 1 euro per caramel), and come in nature flavor (“plain”, or sea salt butter-flavored), and a variety of infusions, such as mango, ginger, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

In case you are curious about all the chocolate bells, the French happen to believe that on Easter, the chocolate is brought not by a bunny, but by a big bell that flies in from Rome (which I first found out from my favorite David Sedaris story Jesus Shaves a few years back. Here is a link to this hilarious and short piece, in case you are curious: http://scottduncan.free.fr/blog/jesus_shaves.pdf

Groggy from all the butter and caramels, we took a quick nap, and woke up in the late afternoon, at the perfect time to skip the lines and casually walk into the wonderfully quirky Centre Pompidou, a great modern art museum conveniently located on our way to dinner:

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is important to note that few good restaurants are open on Sundays, therefore you have to manage your experience through careful planning. Prior to leaving for France, I had scored a reservation at Le Verre Vole (The Stolen Glass), a wonderful tiny wine bar (cave a manger) in the Marais, with a small, hand-picked selection of bio (organic) wines and a delicious menu.

We shared an amazing spring vegetable salad, and each had an entree (mine was a wonderfully comforting boudin noir).

 

 

 

 

The aromatic and food-friendly Cote-Rotie from Domaine Jean-Michel Stephan perfectly guided us from course to course. A country-style apple tart brought our first day in Paris to a satisfying close…

28 thoughts on “Day 1: Butter, Bells, and Stolen Glass

  1. Wonderful!!!! This sounded divine. ” crepe complet au jambon cru de Savoie (filled with nutty, melted gruyère and topped with an egg and top-quality ham). For dessert, we chose a simple crepe with sugar and Bordier butter.” especially when I haven’t had breakfast yet. I miss ham!!! Living a traditional Egyptian life means a traditional Egyptian diet, very simple, tomatoes, garlic, onions and Fhul (beans) are the stable so it is a constant challenge to do something different!! I like a lot of variety. Perhaps a trip to Paris might be in order..

    • Thank you!
      Believe me, I have learned about the Sunday problem the hard way. In Paris where everyone (residents and visitors alike) expects to have a stellar food experience, you have to plan ahead. It is respectful to reserve whenever possible, anyway.

  2. Dear Maiali, another great post! Do you know why the cider is served in a bowl? I notice this happens once in a while…. What about the blue tea? Did it meet the expectations??

    PS: I love your posts! Although I always end up a little jealous :)

    • Serving cider in a bowl is a Breton tradition. I suspect it is because Brittany is so renouned for its pottery. In technical terms, a wider bowl on a glass translates into a greater surface for the cider to “open up”, but it disperses the aromatics and kills the tiny bubbles, etc. from the fermentation. I guess that would make it easier-drinking, sturdier, and a larger receptacle for large quantities of cider to wash down the galettes :-)
      As for the blue tea, it is pretty awesome. It is a type of semi-oxidized oolong, and the one we had from Formosa was super aromatic and subtle. Everything I love in a specialty tea!

  3. Sounds like a wonderful day of eating. Your writing indicates your methodical appraoch to the simple pleasure of sharing good food together. I love seeing the pictures. Thank you!

    • I love your succinct description (“the methodical approach to the simple pleasure”)!
      Yes, I am a financial analyst (and a Virgo), so everything, even maximizing pleasure is a result of systematic and deliberate actions :-). Thanks so much for reading!

  4. Thank you for dropping by my blog. I’m so happy to have found you. You post has me missing the trips to France heavily sprinkled through my young and young adult life… it’s been a very long 10 years without one! Next time I visit my Sis in London, I will have to visit again. Cheers!

      • ohh, that sounds yummy! I loved the markets in Nice, which your picture with the artichokes, reminded me of. I can’t just pop over to France like I used to, when I lived in London, but I feel much better about that when I go to our California farmer’s markets, which aren’t too shabby! All the best! L.

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